Union Salaries EXPO$ED
Union Dues = Big Payday for Union Bosses



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Union bosses continue to pocket big salaries, all while their members have been unemployed and/or underemployed since the start of the Great Recession in 2009.

The following figures are staggering when you consider how much dues money these union bosses have been taking home.  The construction industry has been absolutely annihilated, yet bosses continued to raid the union treasury for their own selfish purposes.

Americanthinker.com accurately points out, "According to the BLS the national unemployment rate in the construction industry peaked in February 2010 at 27.1% with 5,533,000 employees.  Two years later, in February 2012, the official construction unemployment rate has fallen to 17.1% with 5,554,000 employees.  Given the construction unemployment rate and construction employees, we can calculate the labor force and the number of unemployed, as seen below.

Over the past 24 months, the government's official construction unemployment rate has dropped by 10%, and reported construction employment has grown by 21,000 jobs.  However, in order to drop 10% off the unemployment rate, 890,211 workers have been removed from the construction labor force, and 911,211 previously unemployed construction workers have disappeared from the ranks of the unemployed, which now numbers 1,145,638.” **

** -Americanthinker.com, October 2012




Date
BLS Unemployment Rate Construction Industry
BLS Current Construction Employment
Construction Labor Force (Calculated)
Unemployed Workers (Calculated)
February 2010
27.1%
5,533,000
7,589,849
2,056,849
February 2012
17.1%
5,554,000
6,699,638
1,145,638
Change
-36.9%
21,000
(890,211)
(911,211)
According to analysis of labor statistics by the website American Thinker, Massachusetts was one of only thirteen states that reached new lows in construction employment for the years January 2007 through January 2012.




Below is information provided by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics for Massachusetts.  These figures represent employees in thousands. 

In 2008, before the crash, the industry was doing pretty well with a high in January of that year of almost 136,000 construction workers.  Reports from August 2012 show the industry employed just 102,000 workers, a drop off of 34,000 people leaving the industry, or a 25% decline.

Imagine any other membership-based organization, like a union, that relies on membership dues losing 25% of its members in a three-year period and all the while the group's leaders continued to take pay raises.  It's unconscionable and union members should demand these bosses resign immediately.


“It’s been awful; there’s no other word to describe it. It hasn’t been a recession, it’s been a Depression.”

Mark Erlich, boss of the Carpenters Union, whose most recent reports indicate his salary is $274,361

- Massachusetts loses 2,600 jobs; unemployment rate at 6 percent, Boston Globe, July 20, 2012
Year
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec
Annual
2002
140.6
141.0
141.4
141.3
141.1
140.8
140.4
140.4
140.0
141.4
141.3
139.5

2003
138.4
135.8
135.8
137.2
137.3
137.1
137.0
136.7
136.6
136.0
136.4
136.0

2004
134.3
135.8
138.2
138.4
139.2
139.8
139.3
139.2
139.0
138.4
138.8
138.9

2005
137.5
136.5
135.9
139.4
139.4
139.5
141.2
140.9
141.5
139.6
141.4
141.3

2006
142.2
143.0
142.8
145.0
142.1
141.4
141.0
140.6
139.8
139.2
138.0
139.2

2007
139.4
137.5
137.0
136.7
137.9
138.7
138.1
138.0
138.3
137.6
137.6
136.6

2008
135.8
136.1
136.1
135.5
134.6
133.5
133.1
132.2
131.4
130.1
127.8
125.6

2009
120.1
119.2
116.3
113.9
111.9
110.5
108.8
108.0
107.5
107.1
106.6
106.9

2010
107.0
107.0
107.1
107.0
106.7
106.6
107.0
106.5
106.5
107.1
107.7
107.8

2011
108.6
108.5
108.3
108.9
109.0
109.4
107.2
107.2
106.6
107.8
106.8
105.8

2012
106.9
107.8
107.4
106.0
104.3
102.4
103.4
101.8
103.1
105.1
104.7
106.1 (P)

P: Preliminary
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Fast Fact

Even though their dues paying union members were struggling to make ends meet, the union bosses continued to take home large salaries.

According to a January, 2010 news report in the Boston Globe, “Blue-collar workers bear brunt of decline - Ratio of job losses at depression level,”  there were 65 unemployed construction workers for every 1 job opening. 
Fast Fact

Union bosses took home a 21% average salary increase during 2007-2009, a period marked as the Great Recession.

According to a June, 2009 study of the Great Recession by the Center for Labor Market Studies of Northeastern University, "...the nation entered a recession in December 2007...Beginning in June (2009), we are now establishing a record for the longest post-World War II recession.

According to the study, from November 2007 to May 2009, workers saw their overall unemployment rate double, rising from 4.7% to 9.4% during that time period. 

To make matters worse, the Center for Labor Market Studies reported that 75% of the rise in total unemployment between May 2008 and May 2009 was attributable to permanent job losses in construction, manufacturing and transportation.